project management

What Should We Do to Be Successful Women Project Managers?

This article is a Part IV of my upcoming book "Women in Project Management"

So what should we do to be successful women project managers?

First and most important is to remain feminine. Knowing that we are surrounded by men in our jobs, they would notice very fast that you are a real woman if you have traits of a fine lady:

What Should We Do to Be Successful Women Project Managers?

This article is a Part IV of my upcoming book "Women in Project Management"

So what should we do to be successful women project managers?

First and most important is to remain feminine. Knowing that we are surrounded by men in our jobs, they would notice very fast that you are a real woman if you have traits of a fine lady:

Our Books Recommendations List on Agile, Kanban, Lean and Business Productivity Themes

Summary:

That list gathers the best books to get knowledge on the most important Agile, Kanban, Lean and Business Productivity related themes.

Books on Agile theme:

  • All About Agile: Agile Management Made Easy! by Kelly Waters
  • Agile Estimating and Planning by Mike Cohn
  • Project Retrospectives: A Handbook for Team Reviews by Norman L. Kerth
  • Agile Retrospectives: Making Good Teams Great by Esther Derby, Diana Larsen, Ken Schwaber

The Waterfall Trap

The first 90 percent of the code accounts for the first 90 percent of the development time. The remaining 10 percent of the code accounts for the other 90 percent of the development time.

By Tom Cargill. Bell Labs.

It sounds a bit funny, yet so many times it’s true. The question is why?

The reason is what I call: “The Waterfall Trap.” Any project, at the moment it starts, uses logic, knowledge, experience and good practices to guess the future. That’s right the plan is at best a very good educated guess.

More is Less: >=<

One key concept to grasp in any form of goal setting, project management, or actual effort in life is that we should strive to never do more than needed, but have a goal of simple elegance. We must realize that More is Less. 

Perhaps one of the best ways to illustrate this principle, it to quote Seth Godin with some comments added by yours truly: 

HKanban - A Holistic Approach to Getting Things Done

Standing on the shoulders of great men.

Like so many Project Managers and busy professionals I too have discovered that is not just enough to manage other people, or the work at hand, we have to manage our efforts in and out of the office, and daily life can be the biggest challenge of all.

The first author to show us ways to improve our productivity was David Allen, his Getting Things Done book was a landmark that I continue to browse occasionally. However I could not get the system to work for me. I wanted something simpler, but still effective.

Beyond the 3 Project Management Constraints - The Agile Kanban Contribution

Traditionally Project Management has identified three constraints that must be managed to achieve success on any project, namely:

  • Time: or the schedule, to meet deadlines and deliver
  • Money: our available budget, and financial resources
  • Scope: extent of work that has to be performed.

Collectively they are known as the Project Management Triangle, and for decades they have been the focal point for the project manager’s efforts.

Is Kaizen Enough?

Kaizen. Japanese for “improvement” is the word behind Toyota’s Total Quality obsession, although nowadays it has suffered in it’s quest to be the number one automaker.

Kaizen origin however goes back to the legacy of a very smart American, Edwards Deming, the father of Total Quality, and the Deming’s Cycle. His ideas went beyond Japan to affect our expectations of products and services. Arguably he led Japan to dominate the auto industry, and get great influence on electronics and robotics. However in the software and mobile sectors Japan has always lagged behind. Why?

It Is Wise to Look Ahead

It is always wise to look ahead, but difficult to look further than you can see.

By Winston Churchill. In Project Management this is a rule, and the consequence to this rule is that the further into the future we try to plan, the less reliable plans become.

However we still must plan! How can we solve this paradox? The answer lies in Agile Methodologies, particularly Lean Kanban. I will explore this subject in the near future.

Activity vs Accomplishment

Do not confuse activity with accomplishment… [you must engage in] specific, clearly identifiable objectives, you gotta have goals!

You will never make it as a wondering generality, you must become a meaningful specific.

A goal properly set is halfway reached.

By Zig Ziglar.

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