Kanban Latte

Agile 2.0: The Ultra-Light Revolution. Lean and Kanban methods
May
16
The Essence of Agile Over 12 years ago the single most important event in recent software development history took place: the birth of the Agile Movement, and the publishing of the Agile Manifesto. The dictionary reminds us that agile is an adjective, it means nimble, quick, light, and able to move with ease. In the 1990s before the Agile Manifesto, Software Development was anything but agile. Ideas and methods that had worked once in construction and engineering were forced into the... + read more
Mar
02
First let us remember that the Agile Movement was born in 2001 in the field of Software Development, at a time when complex and highly ineffective methods and management philosophies were being used to try to deliver software projects. They were collectively called heavy processes, because of the large number of steps they required to get anything done, the Rational Unified Process or RUP is one of them. Agile represents a response to these failing methods and philosophies, and a promise of... + read more
Mar
02
No horse gets anywhere until its harnessed, otherwise it just runs wild on the field. No Niagara is ever turned into light and power until it’s tunneled. No life ever grows great until it is focused, dedicated, and disciplined. By Harry Emerson Fosdick. The power of focus and discipline brings success! Learn to use it to get the best from your abilities, and talents. Keep balance, focus on what’s good, give to others and finish strong. These are the principles... + read more
Mar
02
The road to life isn’t linear. It isn’t Sherbrooke Street. It’s more like Côte-des-Neiges. It’s a country route, dusty and dirty, with soft shoulders and high banks. Don’t be afraid of taking chances – of striking out on paths that are untrod. Don’t be afraid of failing. Don’t be afraid of making an ass of yourself. I do it all the time and look what I got. By William Shatner. Two factors lead us to success: First being who you are,... + read more
Mar
02
The first 90 percent of the code accounts for the first 90 percent of the development time. The remaining 10 percent of the code accounts for the other 90 percent of the development time. By Tom Cargill. Bell Labs. It sounds a bit funny, yet so many times it’s true. The question is why? The reason is what I call: “The Waterfall Trap.” Any project, at the moment it starts, uses logic, knowledge, experience and good practices to guess the future. That’s... + read more

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